Millennial who whinged about working every day in viral TikTok no longer has a job

A millennial who whinged about having to go to work has revealed he ‘is no longer an employee’ after his video went viral and sparked backlash online.

Lucas originally posted a video to TikTok complaining about having to go to work every day and waking up every morning and saying ‘f *** this’.

His video was viewed more than 107,000 times and divided social media users, with some branding him a ‘princess’ and telling him to ‘suck it up’.

Lucas posted a follow-up video revealing his whingeing had not only drawn attention online but also from his bosses.

A millennial who whinged about having to go to work has revealed he no longer has a job after his video went viral and sparked backlash online

Lucas originally posted a video to TikTok complaining about having to go into work every day and waking up every morning and saying 'f *** this'

Lucas originally posted a video to TikTok complaining about having to go into work every day and waking up every morning and saying ‘f *** this’

‘Congratulations, I’m no longer an employee,’ he says. ‘I have so much more exciting things going on.’

‘I’m so confused why they care so f *** ing much why I don’t like going to work,’ he says. ‘I know a lot of people that f *** ing hate going to work. I’m not the only one. ‘

The video went viral earlier in the week, with several media outlets picking up the story, including Sky News.

In a segment on the channel, commentator Joe Hildebrand told the millennial to ‘shut up’ after watching the video.

The Gen X’er said being in the ‘wedge generation’ meant he had to deal with boomers who ‘can’t work an iPhone’ and millennials who were ‘lazy little s *** s’.

‘All we did was get jobs and not complain,’ the presenter said of his generation.

‘You’re both screwed. You’re both useless. We’re the ones becoming CEO’s and getting it done. We’re paying for both of you. ‘

Sky News host Paul Murray shared a blunt message to the millennial who whinged about his job satisfaction: ‘Welcome to work, pal’.

Pictured: Joe Hildebrand

Joe Hildebrand (left) has told a Millennial who complained about having to go to work everyday (right) to ‘shut up’ and claimed his generation pays for ‘everything’

‘We all have awesome jobs, but in the real world that’s how people feel every day.’

Hildebrand said he knew it could be tough to go to a job that wasn’t ‘spiritually fulfilling’ or ‘matched your ethical values’.

‘We know all this, we really do, but we just don’t care,’ he said. ‘So just shut up and go to work. Because we’re paying for everything, because we’re Gen X. ‘

In the original video, Lucas shared his candid views of work on social media with the caption: ‘Sorry probably not the motivation you need for today.’

The video starts with Lucas putting a seatbelt on while sitting in the driver’s seat.

In a video posted to social media young worker Lucas (pictured) complained about his job satisfaction asking viewers if anyone actually enjoys going to work

In a video posted to social media young worker Lucas (pictured) complained about his job satisfaction asking viewers if anyone actually enjoys going to work

‘Does anybody actually f *** ing enjoy going to work, I wake up every day and I say’ F *** this, ‘Lucas said.

Lucas sarcastically ends his work rant complaining about his job satisfaction.

‘I’ve never left work and been like’ today was such a good day ‘,’ he said.

The video posted to TikTok account has received over 106,000 views and has Boomers firing back at the Millennial’s view of work.

‘Suck it up princess, you got until you’re 65-70 years old,’ one user commented.

‘You need to appreciate what you’ve got bro, some people don’t get the opportunity to have a job,’ another user wrote.

‘Be thankful that you have a job, I’ve been trying to find a job for a year and people who are complaining about their job p ** s me off no end,’ a third chimed.

Lucas (pictured left and right) divided viewers with his opinion with many arguing the Millennial should either quit or be grateful that he has a job

Most users said they enjoyed their job and suggested the unsatisfied worker change his occupation.

‘Because you’re working on a job you don’t like. Quit and find a new one that you enjoy mate, ‘one user wrote.

‘Change job and quit complaining,’ another commented.

It’s not the first time a feud has erupted on social media between different generations of workers.

Corporate coach Kathy McKenzie previously told Daily Mail Australia the number one thing young workers despise is unnecessarily being told what to do by their older bosses.

She added that the issue is even more magnified when Baby Boomers share obvious directions with younger staff – particularly women.

Dianne, 66, said Boomers are not the problem - it's just that Millennials, Gen Y and Z are soft

Dianne, 66, said Boomers are not the problem – it’s just that Millennials, Gen Y and Z are soft

Boomers hit back at ‘lazy’ Millennials, Gen Y and Z, complaining about working conditions, calling the generation ‘weak babies’ who have no clue about the real world.

‘Youngsters are leaving the workplace because they’d rather sit home on Centrelink payments than doing an actual job,’ Dianne, 66, commented as a furious discussion broke out over the issue online.

‘I’ve worked with young managers and ones who are well over retirement age. Being af *** wit is actually a defect which is found across the age spectrum.

‘If your boss is lacking in this quality, you’ll be miserable at work regardless of his/ her age bracket.

‘Blaming an entire generation for your woes is easier than taking responsibility for poor choices. It’s also spineless and lacking in substance. ‘

Another said: ‘So are these whiny, weak babies that quit their jobs moving back in with mummy and daddy? How are they supporting themselves? ‘

A third wrote: ‘One day this generation will be in charge. We’re all doomed. ‘

Others commented that the complaints of ‘me, myself & I’ generations are ‘a bit rich’ coming from a group of people who go out of their way to be offended and then post ‘themselves crying on social media’ about it.

Amy Halvorsen, 33, walked out on her job as a nurse after enduring brutal treatment at the hands of her bosses

Amy Halvorsen, 33, walked out on her job as a nurse after enduring brutal treatment at the hands of her bosses

Disaffected staff are leaving en masse and triggering staff shortages across some of Australia’s most crucial industries including the healthcare sector in what has been dubbed the ‘great resignation’.

A mass exodus of workers fed up with their chosen careers coupled with a sharp slow down of immigration from overseas are two of the key factors driving the 50-year low in unemployment, now sitting at 3.9 per cent.

The scope of the issue troubling bosses was laid bare in the latest jobs report by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, with 423,500 vacancies going unfilled.

Among the sectors most devastated by a shortfall in staff is the healthcare sector, with 20,000 ‘burnt out’ nurses walking out on the job last year.

One of those who quit, Amy Halvorsen, said there was a ‘huge gap’ between nurses working on the floor and management.

The 33-year-old started working as a registered nurse in 2017 and was on the front line of the Covid outbreak serving in the neurology and trauma unit at Sydney’s Westmead Hospital.

Among the sectors most devastated by a shortfall in staff is the healthcare sector with 20,000 'burnt out' nurses walking out on the job last year (Ms Halvorsen pictured being interviewed)

Among the sectors most devastated by a shortfall in staff is the healthcare sector with 20,000 ‘burnt out’ nurses walking out on the job last year (Ms Halvorsen pictured being interviewed)

‘It was so understaffed throughout 2021, and when the new waves of the virus kept coming, there was just no reprieve at all,’ she said.

‘As soon as beds finally started to empty out, we’d be hit with another wave, and there was no forward planning by the health department or the government to fix it.

‘They just see numbers and targets and percentages, not what health staff are going through,’ she said.

New data makes it clear the Great Resignation phenomenon is unfolding in Australia with the ABS revealing the number of people who quit to change jobs or chase a business opportunity was now much higher than the tally of people being sacked or retrenched.

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